Reconstructive Surgery

Ptosis

The upper eyelids can droop for a variety of reasons, causing a condition known as ptosis. The most common cause is weakening of the main muscle which is responsible for lifting the eyelid. Via either an external or internal approach, the eyelids can be elevated, thereby improving one's peripheral vision and appearance.

Video Title : Narrated, Ptosis

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Ptosis – Before
Copyright Henry Lee


Ptosis – After
Copyright Henry Lee

 

Ectropion and Entropion

Malpositioned eyelids can cause significant issues and discomfort. The eyelid may be turned outward (ectropion) or inward (entropion). These malpositioned eyelids typically result in irritation, tearing, and eye redness, as well as a host of other complaints. There are several treatment options that are available in order to improve the position of the eyelid and to improve overall comfort and vision.


Ectropion – Before
Copyright Henry Lee


Ectropion – After
Copyright Henry Lee


Entropion – Before
Copyright Henry Lee


Entropion - After
Copyright Henry Lee

 

Tear Duct

Obstructions involving the tear duct, or drain, cause significant issues with tearing. Obstructions may be caused by trauma, previous surgery, previous chemotherapy or radiation therapy, or many other factors. Most commonly, however, there is no identifiable cause. Surgery is performed to re-establish a patent tear duct and to alleviate tearing symptoms. This is performed on an out-patient basis.

Video Title : Anatomy, Eye Anterior - Tear Ducts

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Tear Duct Surgery – Before
Copyright Henry Lee


Tear Duct Surgery - After
Copyright Henry Lee

 

Thyroid Eye Disease

Thyroid eye disease can cause numerous changes to the structures surrounding the eyes. The fat and muscles behind the eye can enlarge significantly, causing the eye to be pushed forward and to become more prominent. The muscles can also become scarred, resulting in double vision. Finally, the eyelids can become retracted, causing the eyes to be more open. This often results in irritated, dry eyes. In a minority of patients, the pressure caused by the expansion of the fat and muscles behind the eye can affect the optic nerve, resulting in decreased vision. Given the multitude of effects that thyroid eye disease can have, an individualized, well-planned reconstruction must be performed.

 

Eyelid Skin Cancer

Skin cancers involving the eyelids and face frequently require surgical removal. Matossian Eye Associates’ skilled oculofacial specialist is equipped not only to perform these excisions, but also to reconstruct the eyelids and face. Using this combined approach, the cure rate for the most common forms of skin cancer is 98% or higher.


Skin Cancer Reconstruction – Before
Copyright Henry Lee


Skin Cancer Reconstruction – After
Copyright Henry Lee


Skin Cancer Reconstruction – Before
Copyright Henry Lee


Skin Cancer Reconstruction – After
Copyright Henry Lee


Skin Cancer Reconstruction – Before
Copyright Henry Lee


Skin Cancer Reconstruction – After
Copyright Henry Lee

 

Facial Nerve Palsy

Paralysis of the facial nerve can be a distressful condition. It results in drooping of the affected side of the face. Importantly, it affects the muscles that help close the eyes, and patients with a facial nerve palsy may develop issues with dryness, corneal abrasions, and even corneal ulcers or infections. If the cause of the paralysis is a Bell's Palsy, the symptoms are usually temporary, and patients can often be treated with conservative, supportive measures. However, in cases of facial nerve palsy which are considered permanent, as can be seen following certain types of neurosurgery, surgical intervention may be required. In addition, if there are signs of a slowly healing abrasion or ulcer, a surgical procedure may be indicated.

 

Orbital Fractures

Fractures involving the bones surrounding your eye are common with facial injuries. While many patients often do not need surgery to correct orbital fractures, Matossian Eye Associates' experienced oculofacial specialist is able to repair these fractures, often with a hidden incision. These fractures are typically repaired in an outpatient facility, and patients are usually able to return home a few hours after surgery.

 

Facial Laceration Repair

A laceration (cut) is a wound caused by a sharp or dull object. Depending on the sharpness of the object, the edges of the wound may be jagged, dirty, or bleeding. Lacerations may occur anywhere on the body, but when they occur on the face, the long-term cosmetic result is obviously of considerable importance. Lacerations most often affect the skin, but any tissue may be lacerated, including subcutaneous fat, tendons, nerves, blood vessels, and muscle. Facial lacerations can occur in areas of the face such as the eyelid, lip, nose, and ears that require the delicate expertise of an oculo-facial plastic surgeon. Deep penetrating injuries and tearing lacerations of the face, lips or ears should definitely be cared for by a board-certified expert.

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