PRK

PRK is a form of laser vision correction surgery which eliminates the need for glasses and contact lenses in most patients, including patients with astigmatism. Similarly to LASIK, it has been performed for over 20 years across the US and the rest of the world, and numerous clinical studies and surveys demonstrated a high rate of satisfaction among patients.

View Video

Learn About the Difference Between LASIK & PRK

Phakic Intraocular Lens Implants – ICL

Patients with high myopia (strong minus prescription) who do not qualify for LASIK or PRK laser surgery may qualify for phakic intraocular lens implants
We offer Visian ICL implants form Staar Surgical®. These lenses are surgically implanted into the eye and are positioned behind the iris and in front of the natural lens. They eliminate the need for glasses or contact lenses, or greatly reduce their power.

View Video

Learn About Post ICL Implants

Reading Vision Correction – Presbyopia Correction

The natural lens inside the human eye has the ability to adjust focus from distant to near objects, a process known as accommodation. This is accomplished by contraction and relaxation of the ciliary muscle inside the eye. The natural lens becomes thinner or thicker and this allows it to focus at different distances. Unfortunately, humans start losing this ability to change focus in their 40s. This results in difficulty focusing on near objects and in practical terms it translates to difficulty reading small print. The simple solution to this problem is reading glasses, however, the KAMRA inlay offers the ability to focus on near objects without glasses.

KAMRA Inlay

Kamra Inlay

KAMRA and Raindrop are corneal inlays which are surgically implanted into the cornea. The KAMRA inlay is implanted in the cornea of the non-dominant eye only and increases its depth of focus. It is a thin opaque ring with a central opening and can be thought of as a contact lens permanently implanted between the layers of the cornea. It is similar to the aperture in a photo camera or a pinhole. As a result, the amount of light entering the eye is reduced, but the depth of focus is increased which results in distant, intermediate, and near objects to all be in focus at the same time. The dominant eye remains unaltered and retains distance vision only. The side effects of the KAMRA inlay may include difficulties with contrast sensitivity, problems with night vision, double vision, ghost images, glare, halos, and color disturbances.

View Video

PRK Overview

The procedure is very similar to LASIK, but the corneal flap is not created. Instead, the outermost layer of the cornea is surgically removed and the excimer laser reshapes the underlying corneal layers.

View Video

PRK Post-Op

Similarly to LASIK, to qualify for PRK the patients must be at least 18 years old and have stable prescription in their glasses or contact lenses for at least 1 year. PRK is usually performed in cases where the cornea does not have adequate thickness to safely perform LASIK. Also, patients with recurrent corneal erosions who do not qualify for LASIK can be treated with PRK. The final visual outcomes and satisfaction rates are very similar to LASIK. Patients with keratoconus or suspected of early keratoconus should not undergo PRK. After a period of time a small portion of patients may regress and may need a mild pair of prescription glasses or laser enhancement.